EVOCATIVE OBJECTS

At the edge

Of the tide

Of the mind

Of memory

Liminal

 Between land and sea there are echoes of others, a peg for imagination, stirring old feelings and memories. The Land, it's geology, physical geography, biology and archaeology are the resource for the imagery and ideas here.

Defying categorization, combining references and deliberately fugitive in meaning, the exhibits in this part of Evocative Objects fall into three parts. All are related to each other, variously using porcelain, earthenware, copper, iron wire, titanium, silver, carnelian, turquoise, stainless steel, and precious stones.

The micro sculptures are built from a mix of fine porcelain, earthenware, copper, iron, silver, titanium, stainless steel and lead. 

The Jewellery uses silver, semi precious stones, neolithic stone beads, and porcelain.

 

The Land /solway tiles

The solway tiles series refer to Landscape as maps, plans and aerial views. The surface, the Solway, tidal salt marshes, winter, and coastal crops and the effects of drought and flood on crops. They explore the way a shift of scale can allow the viewer to understand the same landscape as both far and near.

 Solway Winter Estuary Tile. Black clay, porcelain, copper, titanium wire. Jan Goodey.

Solway Winter Estuary Tile. Black clay, porcelain, copper, titanium wire. Jan Goodey.

 A selection of Objects from the Museum of Conjecture.

The Museum Curator has attempted to reconstruct objects from random fragments of archaeology found in the vaults of the museum – trying to make sense from nonsense. He has arrived at a selection of ceramics and jewellery and a few sculptural 'ritual' pieces in an effort to recreate something that might, just possibly, have been part of an earlier civilization. Some pieces have been conserved or mended in order to extend their lives.

'A last supper'   jan goodey.

 Discarded Objects/colonisation or infestation

Colonisation or infestation turns fragments of discarded objects into something different, these focus on the microscopic living elements that underpin the biosphere – mostly the land – and their modes of subsistence. Using and adapting the remnants until they no longer function or are worn out, they gradually sink into the earth and then forgotten. The micro-sculptures are small complex, well organised structures, which can sometimes be read as visual analogies for the situations or states of mind we experience. They are tactile, made to be held in the hand for close observation and many have intricate moveable parts, which respond to vibrations.

 'SPRUNG'   copper and porcelain. jan goodey

'SPRUNG'   copper and porcelain. jan goodey

Evocative Objects        at Sprint Mill, Burneside, Kendal, Cumbria, LA8 9QA        Exhibition text

 We live in a world that is becoming increasingly cluttered, a world in which the plethora of objects we own can be a blessing or a burden, or by turns both. A new exhibition ‘Evocative Objects' seeks to explore our relationship with objects and examines  how they communicate ideas and emotions to us.

The artists Jan Goodey and Victoria Eden have developed these ceramic pieces over the past two years. Jan Goodey was previously course leader in Foundation Studies and subsequently course leader for BA Contemporary Jewellery at the University of Cumbria and will be remembered by many Kendalians as the jeweller in residence at The Brewery during the early part of her career. Victoria Eden retired as Head of Art at Casterton School in 2012 and has worked in the area as a potter and ceramist since 1976. Both artists are working primarily in clay with the addition of other materials to express their ideas.

 Jan Goodey uses the Land as her resource, the geology, physical geography, biology and archaeology. Her micro sculptures are built from a mix of fine porcelain, earthenware, copper, iron, silver, titanium, stainless steel and lead.

The Solway Tiles series refer to Landscape as maps, plans and aerial views. They explore the way a shift of scale can allow the viewer to understand the same landscape as both far and near.

Colonies and Infestations suggest alternative ecosystems based on the unseen and microscopic organisms of life and on fragments of exoskeletons of un-nameable creatures. These are small complex, well organised structures, which can sometimes be read as visual analogies for the situations or states of mind we experience. They are tactile, made to be held in the hand for close observation and have intricate moveable parts, which respond to vibrations.

A selection of Objects from the Museum of Conjecture is also shown here. In this scenario The Museum curator has attempted to decipher objects from random fragments of archaeology found in the vaults of the museum. Ceramic Objects and Jewellery have been ‘reconstructed’ in an effort to recreate something that might, just possibly, have been part of an earlier civilisation.                                                 

For information please contact Jan Goodey

jan@jangoodey.com

Tel 015395 62342 or 016973 51146